News

Leah Olson appointed CEO of PAMI

After an extensive search, the Prairie Agricultural Machinery Institute (PAMI) board of directors is pleased to announce Leah Olson as the new Chief Executive Officer effective April 13, 2020.

Leah has over 15 years of senior management experience in the agriculture, manufacturing, and transportation industries. She serves as a director or advisor to numerous organizations including: Sabanto Ag, Intelliconn and Ag West Bio. Some of Leah’s previous roles include CEO of DOT Technology Corp., CEO of SeedMaster Manufacturing, and President of the Agricultural Manufacturers of Canada. She also served as a Chief of Staff and Senior Policy Advisor to numerous provincial and federal ministers.

A life-long learner, Leah has a Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree from Queen’s University and a Master’s Degree in Public Policy and Public Administration from Concordia University. She brings a wealth of experience in product development in both the public and private sectors. Leah communicates fluently in French and English.

“Leah is right for the job,” said Tim Oleksyn, Chairman of the Board of PAMI. “Her strong team approach, extensive agricultural background and drive to embrace innovation will further strengthen PAMI’s strategic alliances and expand our footprints in Canada and internationally.”

“I am very excited to be joining the PAMI team,” said Leah Olson. “At this time of uncertainty, I am optimistic that by working together we can help translate applied research into meaningful products that will provide high quality jobs, and increased productivity for those we work with. PAMI’s team is uniquely positioned to do this especially in agriculture, mining and transportation.”

News release

IMII and WESTEST Join Forces to Harness the Power of Digital Technologies

A new project looks to demonstrate the power and cost‐efficiency of deploying advanced modeling and simulation tools to investigate how dust is released underground in potash mines as ore moves from the rock face to skipping to surface.

Click here to read the News Release.

Measuring and Estimating Airflow Rates From Fans

Airflow resistance in a grain bin is an important measure as it dictates how much airflow (cfm or cubic feet of air per minute) your fan is pushing into the grain.

This handout describes two methods for using airflow resistance to know or predict airflow rate.

Click here to open the“Measuring and estimating airflow rates from fans” handout.

Note: This handout should be used in conjunction with manufacturer information. (i.e. “Grain Guard Fan Guide” and the video titled “Selecting Fans for Grain Conditioning and Natural Air Drying.”

 

Using Supplemental Heat to Manage Grain in the Bin – FAQ

Rain, snow and cool temperatures at harvest time mean producers
must manage grain in the bin as carefully as they manage it in the field.
Adding supplemental heat to natural air drying (NAD) can be an efficient
and effective way to dry stored grain if done correctly.

Click here for the answers to some frequently asked questions about supplemental heat.

Supplemental Heating for Natural Air Drying Grain

Click  here for the Aeration vs NAD  vs NAD + heating vs Heated Air Drying presentation .

Guidebook For Straight Cutting Canola

This guidebook summarizes the results from the “Canola Direct-Cut Harvest System Development” project and includes general harvest management aspects acquired by PAMI through its years of field testings.

Click here for the Guidebook For Straight Cutting Canola

Interim Research Update: Improved Management Of Stored Pulses

Year one of a two-year study on storage of pulses
is complete. The overall objective of the project is
to better define best management practices for
the storage of pulses.

Click here for the Interim Research Update.

PAMI-WESTEST mobile sensor to monitor spoilage in grain bins set to demo at Ag In Motion

PAMI and WESTEST are in the initial phase of developing a mobile sensor that can wirelessly transmit real-time data from the grain bin to a mobile phone. The sensor, small enough to fit in the palm of a hand, will be able to measure relative humidity, temperature and air motion and calculate moisture content throughout the bin to provide farmers with a unique solution for monitoring spoilage. Its small size and shape will allow the sensor to be fed into bins through grain conveying equipment to monitor grain health and measure temperature at a large number of random locations within the bin.

Click here to more details.

PAMI And Alberta Pulse Growers Collaborate To Help Alberta Producers Better Manage Stored Pulse Crops

Researchers at the Prairie Agricultural Machinery Institute (PAMI) are collaborating with Alberta Pulse Growers (APG) to provide information and tools to Alberta growers on how to better manage their grain and pulses during the storage seasons.

“PAMI has been doing grain storage research for several decades,” said Dr. Joy Agnew, program manager with Prairie Agricultural Machine Institute in Humboldt, Saskatchewan. “This partnership will help get the results and important information to the primary stakeholders: the producers.”

Click here to read the full News Release.

PAMI researcher is presenting at international mycotoxin conference in the Netherlands

Charley Sprenger, B.E., M.Sc., is presenting at the World Mycotoxin Forum in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, March 13. The World Mycotoxin Forum is the leading international meeting series on mycotoxins where food and feed industry representatives meet with people from universities and governments from around the world.

Click here to read more.